Alzheimer’s disease can be detected by blood test


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Researchers at the University of Washington in St. Louis have developed a simple blood test that may be able to detect if a person is developing Alzheimer's disease.

Amyloid plaques, the buildup of beta-amyloid proteins in the brain, begin to develop more than 15 years before symptoms of Alzheimer's disease begin to emerge. At the moment, the only ways to monitor plaque buildup are through PET scanners or spinal tapping procedures.

The new blood test measures the amounts of three amyloid subtypes, beta amyloid peptides 38, 40 and 42. Beta 42 amyloid levels have been found to be consistently 10 to 15 percent lower than beta 40 amyloids in persons with plaques Amyloid in the brain.

"Amyloid plaques are composed primarily of beta 42 amyloid, so it probably means it is being deposited in the brain before it passes into the bloodstream," Randall J. Bateman, MD, professor of neurology at the University of Washington in St Louis And the lead author study explained in a press release.

The blood test is said to have an accuracy of 89 percent more than 20 blood samples. The experiment will expand to 180 people.

The study was published at the International Conference of the Alzheimer's Association in London and published in the journal Alzheimer and Dementia.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. The amyloid plaque begins to develop years before the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease appear.
2. PET scanners and spinal tapping procedures can monitor plaque buildup
3. A blood test performed on a medical body
4. The assay measures the amounts of three amyloid subtypes; The result shows that a person has plaque buildup

VOICEOVER (in English):

"Amyloid plaques, the accumulation of beta-amyloid proteins in the brain, begin to develop more than 15 years before the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease begin to emerge."

"At the moment, the only ways to monitor plaque buildup are through PET scanners or spinal tapping procedures."

"Researchers have developed a new blood test that can detect amyloid beta accumulation in the brain."

"The test measures the amounts of three amyloid subtypes, amyloid beta peptides 38, 40 and 42. Beta 42 amyloid levels have been found to be consistently 10 to 15 percent lower than amyloid beta 40 in persons with amyloid plaques in brain."

SOURCES: Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, New Scientist, New Atlas

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Alzheimer’s disease can be detected by blood test

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